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Stanford's Africa Map (1879)

Stanford's Africa Map (1879)

Reproduction of a very interesting map of Africa published by our founder Edward Stanford in 1879 and showing the continent in the relatively early stages of its colonization. The information marked on the map forms a fascinating mixture of names of towns, countries or colonial possessions, geographical regions or features such as deserts, and of many African tribes. Although the map has no physical colouring, it instantly conveys much information about the continent’s geography through the distribution of the already explored regions with established administrative entities. The bulk of the coastline is already in colour and various political units are shown in the more accessible Sahel belt, from the Atlantic along the Niger and around Lake Chad to Darfur and northern Ethiopia. However, the Sahara and the great expanse of the continent around the Congo (called here Livingstone River) and further south and east are yet to be colonized. Although, in many places, particularly in East Africa, various geographical features are already marked on the map. Latitude and longitude lines are drawn at 10° intervals. Of all the continents, Africa has undergone most changes from the mid 19th century to the present day and this map provides an early step towards understanding its history.

Page Size: 12.75 x 17 in (319 x 430 mm)

Stanford's Chart of the Solent, Spithead and Southampton Water (1932)

Stanford's Chart of the Solent, Spithead and Southampton Water (1932)

The Stanford’s Chart of The Solent, Spithead and Southampton Water is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive. Published in 1932, prepared under the supervision of Captain O.M.Watts, A.I.N.A. This map shows the entire Isle of Wight and the surrounding coast line from Selsey to Milford on Sea with inset charts of Beaulieu River, Bembridge, Cowes, Hamble River, River Itchen, Keyhaven, Lymington River, Newtown River, Wootton Creek and Yarmouth. This chart contains lots of tidal information and explanations. Soundings are given at low water ordinary spring tides in fathoms upon the general chart, and in feet upon the inserts. Based upon British Admiralty Charts with the permission of the controller of H.M. Stationary Office and of the Hydrographer of the Navy. This beautifully detailed map will be appeal to anyone with nautical interests.

Page Size: 26.25 x 40.25 in (666 x 1016 mm)

Stanford's Eastern Hemisphere Map (1877)

Stanford's Eastern Hemisphere Map (1877)

The Stanford’s Map of The Eastern Hemisphere is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive. The original map from 1877 was drawn by Stanford’s Geographical Establishment and “published under the direction of the Committee of General Literature and Education Appointed by The Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge and of the National Society”. Individual countries are presented in gentle pastel hues, typical of hand-coloured maps, with their borders outlined in stronger colours. The publication date of 1877 gives us a Europe of large imperial states, much of Asia is as we know it, but Africa is still in the early stages of colonization with its interior largely unexplored. Hachures are used to show the mountain ranges and many other features of contemporary cartography are included: ocean currents and trade winds, surrounding frames showing the tropical zones and the position of the sun, etc. Latitude and longitude lines are drawn at 10° intervals. Additional panels on this map of the Eastern Hemisphere give the continents as viewed from the two poles. At the bottom there is a comparative series of vertical cross-sections showing the principle elevations of each continent on their respective parallels of latitude. They are also as sections showing them as they stand in relation to each other in their distances from the central meridian.

Page Size: 52.25 x 61.5 in (1326 x 1558 mm)

Stanford's Eastern Hemisphere Map (1877) - Resized to 2A0 width

Stanford's Eastern Hemisphere Map (1877) - Resized to 2A0 width

Resized so that the short side is equivalent to 2A0 short side. The Stanford’s Map of The Eastern Hemisphere is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive. The original map from 1877 was drawn by Stanford’s Geographical Establishment and “published under the direction of the Committee of General Literature and Education Appointed by The Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge and of the National Society”. Individual countries are presented in gentle pastel hues, typical of hand-coloured maps, with their borders outlined in stronger colours. The publication date of 1877 gives us a Europe of large imperial states, much of Asia is as we know it, but Africa is still in the early stages of colonization with its interior largely unexplored. Hachures are used to show the mountain ranges and many other features of contemporary cartography are included: ocean currents and trade winds, surrounding frames showing the tropical zones and the position of the sun, etc. Latitude and longitude lines are drawn at 10° intervals. Additional panels on this map of the Eastern Hemisphere give the continents as viewed from the two poles. At the bottom there is a comparative series of vertical cross-sections showing the principle elevations of each continent on their respective parallels of latitude. They are also as sections showing them as they stand in relation to each other in their distances from the central meridian.

Page Size: 47 x 55 in (1189 x 1397 mm)

Stanford's Eastern and Western Hemispheres Map (1877)

Stanford's Eastern and Western Hemispheres Map (1877)

The Stanford’s Map of The Western and Eastern Hemispheres is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive. The original map from 1877 was drawn by Stanford’s Geographical Establishment and “published under the direction of the Committee of General Literature and Education Appointed by The Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge and of the National Society”. Individual countries are presented in gentle pastel hues, typical of hand-coloured maps, with their borders outlined in stronger colours. The publication date of 1877 gives us the Americas more or less as we know it now but Antarctica with only a handful of coastal places named and believed to be flat. On the eastern side we see a Europe of large imperial states, much of Asia is as we know it, but Africa is still in the early stages of colonization with its interior largely unexplored. The stereographic projection, individual countries are presented in gentle pastel hues typical of hand-coloured maps, with their borders outlined in stronger colours. Latitude and longitude lines are drawn at 10° intervals. Hachures are used to show the mountain ranges and many other features of contemporary cartography are included: ocean currents and trade winds, surrounding frames showing the tropical zones and the position of the sun, etc. Additional panels on the side of the Western Hemisphere give examples of six different map projections, including Mercator’s projection and the gores of a globe complete on the same scale at the equator. On the side of the Eastern Hemisphere you can see additional panels of the continents as viewed from the two poles as well as a comparative series of vertical cross-sections showing the principle elevations of each continent on their respective parallels of latitude.

Page Size: 58 x 98.5 in (1470 x 2500 mm)

Stanford's Eastern and Western Hemispheres Map (1877) - Resized to 2A0 height

Stanford's Eastern and Western Hemispheres Map (1877) - Resized to 2A0 height

Resized so that the short side is equivalent to 2A0 short side. The Stanford’s Map of The Western and Eastern Hemispheres is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive. The original map from 1877 was drawn by Stanford’s Geographical Establishment and “published under the direction of the Committee of General Literature and Education Appointed by The Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge and of the National Society”. Individual countries are presented in gentle pastel hues, typical of hand-coloured maps, with their borders outlined in stronger colours. The publication date of 1877 gives us the Americas more or less as we know it now but Antarctica with only a handful of coastal places named and believed to be flat. On the eastern side we see a Europe of large imperial states, much of Asia is as we know it, but Africa is still in the early stages of colonization with its interior largely unexplored. The stereographic projection, individual countries are presented in gentle pastel hues typical of hand-coloured maps, with their borders outlined in stronger colours. Latitude and longitude lines are drawn at 10° intervals. Hachures are used to show the mountain ranges and many other features of contemporary cartography are included: ocean currents and trade winds, surrounding frames showing the tropical zones and the position of the sun, etc. Additional panels on the side of the Western Hemisphere give examples of six different map projections, including Mercator’s projection and the gores of a globe complete on the same scale at the equator. On the side of the Eastern Hemisphere you can see additional panels of the continents as viewed from the two poles as well as a comparative series of vertical cross-sections showing the principle elevations of each continent on their respective parallels of latitude.

Page Size: 47 x 79.75 in (1189 x 2022 mm)

Stanford's Facsimile of the Hereford Mappa Mundi (1869)

Stanford's Facsimile of the Hereford Mappa Mundi (1869)

The Stanford’s Facsimile of the Hereford Mappa Mundi is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive.

Page Size: 55.75 x 65.75 in (1410 x 1664 mm)

Stanford's Facsimile of the Hereford Mappa Mundi (1869) - Resized to 2A0 width

Stanford's Facsimile of the Hereford Mappa Mundi (1869) - Resized to 2A0 width

Resized so that the short side is equivalent to 2A0 short side. The Stanford’s Facsimile of the Hereford Mappa Mundi is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive.

Page Size: 47 x 55.25 in (1189 x 1403 mm)

Stanford's Folio Asia Map, by J. Arrowsmith (1884)

Stanford's Folio Asia Map, by J. Arrowsmith (1884)

The Stanford’s Asia Map is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive. This map was made by the famous cartographer John Arrowsmith and published by Stanfords in 1884. Country boundaries are outlined in bright colours while the pale background with subtle hachure to show the mountain ranges makes the numerous place names easy to read. Many smaller tributaries of the continent’s great rivers are named, from the Ob, the Yenisei and the Lena in the north to the Ganges or the Irrawaddy in the south and the Yangtze in the east. Coverage extends to the Equator, so the southern part of Indonesia is not included. While the north of the continent looks as it was 100 years later except for the changes in the European part of Russia, Central Asia and the Middle East are much different from now, Mongolia is still part of China, etc. Names of Chinese ports open to foreign commerce after the Second Opium War are underlined; “Hong-kong I. & Victoria” are duly annotated with Cy for colony. Latitude and longitude lines are drawn at 5° intervals.

Page Size: 21.5 x 29.25 in (543 x 741 mm)

Stanford's Folio British Isles Map (1884)

Stanford's Folio British Isles Map (1884)

The Stanford’s British Isles Map is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive. Published in 1884, this map shows the British Isles with their old historic counties. Bright colours highlight the boundaries of the old counties as they were. The pale background makes all the place names easy to read. In common with other maps published by Stanfords at that time, an unusually large number of small rivers are named, even the lovely Cuckmere is there. Ironically perhaps, the map provides an interesting contrast between the significant administrative changes within Great Britain and the retention of the county borders within Ireland. This map includes lots more interesting historical finds, for example; London looks significantly smaller than it does on maps today mostly falling within the county of Middlesex. This is a great map that beautifully tells this history of counties.

Page Size: 21.75 x 29.5 in (547 x 745 mm)

Stanford's Folio Europe Map, by J. Arrowsmith (1884)

Stanford's Folio Europe Map, by J. Arrowsmith (1884)

The Stanford’s Europe Map is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive. This map was made by the famous cartographer John Arrowsmith and published by Stanfords in 1884. The map presents the continent at the height of its great empires: imperial Russia with Finland and much of Poland, united Germany including Alsace and part of Lorraine, the Austro-Hungarian Empire (although already post the Compromise, still shown here as one country) with north-western Balkans, and the Ottomans still with Albania and much of the present-day Greece. Country boundaries are outlined in bright colours while the pale background with subtle hachuring indicating the mountain ranges are in most places printed very faintly so names of towns and numerous geographical region marked on the map are easy to read. The map also has an unusually large number of names of smaller rivers. Latitude and longitude lines are drawn at 5° intervals.

Page Size: 21.75 x 29.5 in (546 x 745 mm)

Stanford's Folio Japan Map (1884)

Stanford's Folio Japan Map (1884)

The Stanford’s Folio Japan Map is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive.

Page Size: 21.5 x 29.25 in (540 x 740 mm)

Stanford's Folio North America Map (1884)

Stanford's Folio North America Map (1884)

The Stanford’s Map of North America is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive. Originally published in 1884, this map features bright colours highlighting international borders, with corresponding colouring indicating state/provincial borders within USA, Canada and Mexico. Plain background with hachure for mountain ranges makes the place names marked on the map easy to read. Several mountain peaks, mainly in USA, are shown with heights (in feet). In common with other map published by Stanfords around that time, numerous smaller rivers are named. Latitude and longitude lines are drawn at 5° intervals. Whilst at the first glance there have been few significant changes in the international boundaries. Panama is still shown as part of Colombia plus Greenland and Iceland are in Danish colours, internal administrative border provide much interesting detail. In the US all the states which acceded to the Union after the map’s publication date are already there, but with the Dakotas as one state and Oklahoma shown as the Indian Territory and its panhandle as separate Public Lands. In Canada, the northern borders of most of the provinces are much further south than today, southern Saskatchewan called Assiniboia and northern Alberta as Athabasca, etc. Coverage of Canada extends north to the Parry Islands (now Queen Elizabeth Islands), with only the south-eastern coast of the Ellesmere Island. In the Caribbean individual islands are in the colours of their colonial powers (their names are not marked on the map). Another interesting feature are the markings for the submarine telegraph cables.

Page Size: 21.5 x 29 in (545 x 737 mm)

Stanford's Folio Smaller Railway Map of the United States (1876)

Stanford's Folio Smaller Railway Map of the United States (1876)

The Stanford’s Folio Smaller Railway Map of the United States is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive.

Page Size: 22 x 29.75 in (555 x 750 mm)

Stanford's General Map of the World (1920)

Stanford's General Map of the World (1920)

The Stanford’s General Map of the World Map is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive. This map from 1920 reflects the changes in political boundaries and the new world order in the aftermath of World War I. The colouring and annotations to place names not only indicate dominions and colonial possessions, with the British Empire in its customary red, but also show territories administered under the Mandate of the League of Nations. On land masses topographic information is provided by names of mountain ranges and of an unusually large number of rivers. Main railway routes are also marked. On seas and oceans, principal shipping routes are shown annotated with distances. The map has latitude and longitude lines at 15 degree intervals and for each longitude line indicates the time difference with the Greenwich Meridian. The map is drawn on a Mercator’s projection.

Page Size: 18.75 x 28 in (474 x 709 mm)

Stanford's General Map of the World (1920) Blue Version

Stanford's General Map of the World (1920) Blue Version

The Stanford’s General Map of the World Blue Version is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive.

Page Size: 31.5 x 47.25 in (800 x 1200 mm)

Stanford's General Map of the World on Mercator's Projection (1922)

Stanford's General Map of the World on Mercator's Projection (1922)

The Stanford’s General Map of the World on Mercator's Projection is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive.

Page Size: 27.25 x 41.5 in (687 x 1048 mm)

Stanford's Library Map of Africa (1890)

Stanford's Library Map of Africa (1890)

The Stanford’s Library Map of Africa is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive.

Page Size: 35.5 x 39.5 in (900 x 1000 mm)

Stanford's Library Map of London Sheet 1 Black and White (1862)

Stanford's Library Map of London Sheet 1 Black and White (1862)

The Stanford’s Library Map of London (Sheet 1) is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive.

Page Size: 14.75 x 17.75 in (371 x 450 mm)

Stanford's Library Map of London Sheet 10 Black and White (1862)

Stanford's Library Map of London Sheet 10 Black and White (1862)

This map covering Victorian London during a period of rapid expansion and improvement is from a fascinating series of reproductions from our Edward Stanford Cartographic Collection archive. Stanford’s Library Map is one of the great maps of London. It shows the city at a key time of the development of the metropolis and the impact of the railway. Our founder, Edward Stanford took the Ordnance Survey 12 inch to a mile sheets of their Skeleton Survey (showing outline and elevation only) for the Metropolitan Commissioners of Sewers, and despatched his own surveyors to complete immense quantity of detail for which this map is notable. Originally at a scale of 1:10560 a 14x16”map in a series of 24 which included surrounding areas. This map is in black and white and is extremely detailed, naming streets and marking major buildings. The map coverage is of central London and extends out to Marylebone and Knightsbridge to the west showing some of Hyde Park. The northern point includes Bloomsbury and the British Museum. It extends down to Victoria Station and Lambeth Bridge and shows a small portion of Lambeth and Waterloo south of the river. This lovely map will appeal to anyone interested in this great city.

Page Size: 14.75 x 17.75 in (370 x 450 mm)

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